COVID - 19

Frequently asked Questions

SaliveDirect PCR Test / PCR Swab Test:

Expedited Appointments before 11 AM will receive results via a secure and HIPPA compliant portal within 12-24 hours. Appointments after 11 AM will receive results via a secure and HIPPA compliant portal in 48-72 hours.?

Respiratory Pathogen Panel:

Results will be made available via a secure and HIPPA compliant portal within 3-5 days of the specimen arriving at the lab.?Healthcare Professional specimen drop-offs must occur by 10:30 AM for results in 24 hours. Specimen drop-offs after 10:30 AM will have results in 36-48 hours.?

Rapid Antibody (IgG/IgM) Test:

Results will be sent via a secure and HIPPA compliant portal on the same day as the appointment.

Maybe; not everyone needs to be tested for COVID-19.
? If you have symptoms of COVID-19 and want to get tested, call your healthcare provider first. Most people will have mild illness and can recover at home without medical care and may not need to be tested.
? CDC has guidance for who should be tested, but decisions about testing are made by state and local health departments and healthcare providers.
? You can also visit your state or local health departmentís website to look for the latest local information on testing.

Decisions about testing are made by state and local health departments or healthcare providers. If you have symptoms of COVID-19 and are not tested, it is important to stay home. What to do if you are sick.
COVID-19 testing differs by location. If you have symptoms of COVID-19 and want to get tested, call your healthcare provider first. You can also visit your state or local health departmentís website to look for the latest local information on testing. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has authorized viral tests that let you collect either a nasal swab or a saliva sample at home. However, you will still need to send your sample to a laboratory for analysis.
If you test positive for COVID-19, know what protective steps to take if you are sick or caring for someone.
? If you test negative for COVID-19, you probably were not infected at the time your sample was collected. However, that does not mean you will not get sick. The test result only means that you did not have COVID-19 at the time of testing. You might test negative if the sample was collected early in your infection and test positive later during your illness. You could also be exposed to COVID-19 after the test and get infected then. This means you could still spread the virus. If you develop symptoms later, you might need another test to determine if you are infected with the virus that causes COVID-19.
For more information about viral tests, please visit: "Test for Current Infection."

Antibody tests for COVID-19 are available through healthcare providers and laboratories. Check with your healthcare provider to see if they offer antibody tests and whether you should get one.
? A positive test result shows you might have antibodies from an infection with the virus that causes COVID-19. However, there is a chance a positive result means that you have antibodies from an infection with a virus from the same family of viruses (called coronaviruses), such as the one that causes the common cold.
Having antibodies to the virus that causes COVID-19 might provide protection from getting infected with the virus again. If it does, we do not know how much protection the antibodies might provide or how long this protection might last.
? You should continue to protect yourself and others since you could get infected with the virus again. If you test negative, you might not have ever had COVID-19. Talk with your healthcare provider about your test result and the type of test you took to understand what your result means.
Regardless of whether you test positive or negative, the results do not confirm whether or not you are able to spread the virus that causes COVID-19. Until we know more, continue to take steps to protect yourself and others.
? If you want more information about antibody tests, see Test for Past Infection.

Yes, it is possible. You may test negative if the sample was collected early in your infection and test positive later during this illness. You could also be exposed to COVID-19 after the test and get infected then. Even if you test negative, you still should take steps to?protect yourself and others. See Testing for Current Infection for more information.

A novel coronavirus is a new coronavirus that has not been previously identified. The virus causing coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), is not the same as the coronaviruses that commonly circulate among humans and cause mild illness, like the common cold.

On February 11, 2020, the World Health Organization announced an official name for the disease that is causing the 2019 novel coronavirus outbreak, first identified in Wuhan China. The new name of this disease is coronavirus disease 2019, abbreviated as COVID-19. In COVID-19, ĎCOí stands for Ďcorona,í ĎVIí for Ďvirus,í and ĎDí for disease. Formerly, this disease was referred to as ď2019 novel coronavirusĒ or ď2019-nCoVĒ.
? There are many types of human coronaviruses including some that commonly cause mild upper-respiratory tract illnesses. COVID-19 is a new disease, caused by a novel (or new) coronavirus that has not previously been seen in humans.

  • The virus that causes COVID-19 most commonly spreads between people who are in close contact with one another (within about 6 feet, or 2 arm lengths).
  • It spreads through respiratory droplets or small particles, such as those in aerosols, produced when an infected person coughs, sneezes, sings, talks, or breathes.
    These particles can be inhaled into the nose, mouth, airways, and lungs and cause infection. This is thought to be the main way the virus spreads.
    Droplets can also land on surfaces and objects and be transferred by touch. A person may get COVID-19 by touching the surface or object that has the virus on it and then touching their own mouth, nose, or eyes. Spread from touching surfaces is not thought to be the main way the virus spreads.
  • It is possible that COVID-19 may spread through the droplets and airborne particles that are formed when a person who has COVID-19 coughs, sneezes, sings, talks, or breathes. There is growing evidence that droplets and airborne particles can remain suspended in the air and be breathed in by others, and travel distances beyond 6 feet (for example, during choir practice, in restaurants, or in fitness classes). In general, indoor environments without good ventilation increase this risk.
COVID-19 seems to be spreading easily and sustainably in the community (ďcommunityspreadĒ) in any affected geographic areas. Community spread means people have been infected with the virus in an area, including some who are not sure how or where they became infected.

It is not yet known whether weather and temperature affect the spread of COVID-19. Some other viruses, like those that cause the common cold and flu, spread more during cold weather months but that does not mean it is impossible to become sick with these viruses during other months. There is much more to learn about the transmissibility, severity, and other features associated with COVID-19 and investigations are ongoing.

Community spread means people have been infected with the virus in an area, including some who are not sure how or where they became infected. Each health department determines community spread differently based on local conditions. For information on community spread in your area, please visit your health departmentís website.?

At this time, CDC has no data to suggest that this new coronavirus or other similar coronaviruses are spread by mosquitoes or ticks. The main way that COVID-19 spreads are from person to person. See How Coronavirus Spreads for more information.

People with COVID-19 have reported a wide range of symptoms Ė from mild symptoms to severe illness. Symptoms may appear 2-14 days after exposure to the virus. If you have fever, cough, or other symptoms, you might have COVID-19.

Look for emergency warning signs* for COVID-19. If someone is showing any of these signs, seek emergency medical care immediately

  • Trouble breathing
  • Persistent pain or pressure in the chest
  • New confusion
  • Inability to wake or stay awake
  • Bluish lips or face

*This list is not all possible symptoms. Please call your medical provider for any other symptoms that are severe or concerning to you.
Call 911 or call ahead to your local emergency facility: Notify the operator that you are seeking care for someone who has or may have COVID-19.

Yes. It is possible to test positive for flu (as well as other respiratory infections) and COVID-19 at the same time. Global 7 Diagnostics offers a Respiratory Pathogen Panel that can distinguish the difference between the flu and COVID-19.

People at increased risk include:

  • Older Adults.
  • People of all ages with certain underlying medical conditions.
  • Pregnant people might also be at increased risk of severe illness from COVID-19.
Long-standing systemic health and social inequities have put many people from racial and ethnic minority groups at increased risk of getting sick and dying from COVID-19. ? In addition to those at increased risk, there are certain groups of people who require extra precautions during the pandemic.

Currently, there is no evidence to suggest that taking any specific medications, like blood pressure medication or ibuprofen, leads to more severe illness from COVID-19.
Continue to take your medications and to follow your treatment plan as prescribed by your healthcare provider. Any changes to your medications should only be made after talking with your healthcare provider. Contact your healthcare provider if you have questions or concerns. For more information, see People with Underlying Medical Conditions.

Adults with disabilities are more likely to have an underlying medical condition that may put them at increased risk of severe illness from COVID-19 including, but not limited to, heart disease, stroke, diabetes, chronic kidney disease, cancer, high blood pressure, and obesity. In addition, having a disability may make it harder to practice social distancing, wear a mask, and practice hand hygiene.
? For more information, see People with Disabilities and People whom May Need Extra Precautions.

Currently, there is no evidence that people can get COVID-19 by eating or handling food. ? It may be possible that people can get COVID-19 by touching a surface or object, such as a food package or dining ware that has the virus on it, and then touching their own mouth, nose, or possibly their eyes. However, this is not thought to be the main way the virus spreads.
? There is also no current evidence that people can get COVID-19 by drinking water. The COVID-19 virus has not been detected in drinking water. Conventional water treatment methods that use filtration and disinfection, such as those in most municipal drinking water systems, should remove or kill the virus that causes COVID-19.? Learn more about food and COVID-19.

Based on the limited information available to date, the risk of animals spreading COVID-19 to people is considered to below. See If You Have Pets for more information about pets and COVID-19.
However, since animals can spread other diseases to people, itís always a good idea to practice healthy habits around pets and other animals, such as washing your hands and maintaining good hygiene. For more information on the many benefits of pet ownership, as well as staying safe and healthy around animals including pets, livestock, and wildlife, visit CDCís Healthy Pets, Healthy People website.

Based on the limited information available to date, the risk of animals spreading COVID-19 to people is considered to below. See If You Have Pets for more information about pets and COVID-19.
For more information on COVID-19 and other Frequently Asked Questions Please Visit: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/faq.html#Testing

What are the differences between all the COVID-19 tests offered?

Covid 19 RT qPCR (swab) IgM Antibody (blood) IgG Antibody (blood) Clinical Significance
Detected
Patient was most likefacancelly not exposed to SARS-CoV-2
Patient may be in window period of infection
Patient may be in early stage of infection
Patient may be in later or recurrent stage of infection
Patient may be in the recover stage of infection
Patient may be in early stage of infection
Patient may have had past infection, recovered and possibly temporary inmmunity
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